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REVIEW: LG Flatron M2794D Part 6


Image quality

On the LG M2794D, a fast-responding TN panel is used for image display. As a rule, which use this technology work with 6 bits per colour channel. HiFRC activation then ensures that the impression of 16.7 million colours is created.

Here, colours which the model cannot display as native are simulated in that a pixel takes on various colour hues in the course of several frames which then merge to create the desired colour impression in the brain.

If the HiFRC implementation functions correctly, the result is completely pleasant and the image impression comes astonishingly close to a real 8-bit panel. However, when the implementation is mediocre, visible dithering effects may arise, especially in dark colour hues or special patterns.

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Even if LG does not name the panel type used in the M2794D, we can certainly assume that the aforementioned is the case (6-Bit + HiFRC activation). Unfortunately, here, we see in particular the negative effects of mediocre implementation. Dark hues flicker strongly in places. Dithering patterns become visible in places, but this is partly due to the panel size and comparatively low pixel density.

Test of the quality of colour gradients on the LG M2794D.

Even in the factory settings, colour gradients do not look clean, demonstrating visible banding. In the past, other models have shown here that considerably better results are possible, even with a 6-bit TN panel and the use of an FRC implementation. Here, we think it is likely that the standard mode does not represent the neutral monitor settings. This suspicion will become stronger in the video signal processing test.

Naturally, the subjective image quality suffers through the effects described above, even if the effects in the synthetic test images are considerably stronger than those in "real world conditions".

The illumination is good. This means that the LG M2794D joins the growing list of TN panel models which no longer suffer as a result of strong bright patches at the edges of the screen. The black value is a good 16 cd/m² with a strongly reduced brightness of 140 cd/m². This cannot be beaten by many models, even with IPS or VA panels, although these often look darker across the surface (because of the considerably higher viewing angle stability).

The illumination on the LG M2794D is very even.

LG has splashed out on Auto Dimming for the M2794D. When the screen is completely black, the backlight brightness is reduced greatly. This generally indicates an attempt to hide poor illumination, but our model does not demonstrate this flaw. This regulation has hardly any useful value, since even one bright pixel deactivates the dimming.

We can also make positive comments in terms of image homogeneity. The LG M2794D delivers a solid result here with just minimal colour tinges at the edges. Additional changes in full-surface colours at the shortest possible distance from the screen are due to the limitations of TN technology.

The panel in the LG M2794D, because of the WCG CCFL backlight used, has an extended colour space. This gives rise to very saturated colours in the reproduction of smaller colour spaces such as the sRGB colour space used in Windows as long as no calibration is carried out and colour management-enabled software is not used.

Fundamentally, extended colours spaces are normal today, even in the LCD sector. However, these models generally have a switch which limits the native colour space by pushing out the primary colours. The LG M2794D does not offer this option. In this case, a panel without an extended colour space would have been a much more useful decision. For serious image editing in AdobeRGB, which is not practically possible without an extended colour space, nobody would use a TN panel anyway.

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